Accessible Port Guide For Ireland & Iceland Cruise

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Ireland

The Republic of Ireland occupies most of the island of Ireland, off the coast of England and Wales. Its capital, Dublin, is the birthplace of writers like Oscar Wilde, and home of Guinness beer. The 9th-century Book of Kells and other illustrated manuscripts are on show in Dublin’s Trinity College Library. Dubbed the “Emerald Isle” for its lush landscape, the country is dotted with castles like medieval Cahir Castle.

Island of Ireland

Cobh (Cork)

Cobh (Cork) Ireland

Cobh is a town in Ireland, on an island in Cork city’s harbour. It’s known as the Titanic’s last port of call in 1912. Titanic Experience Cobh is a themed attraction in the former White Star Line ticket office. More displays on the liner are in the Cobh Heritage Centre, which also explores how Cobh became an embarkation point during Ireland’s mass emigrations. North of town, huge Fota Wildlife Park is on Fota Island.

Cobh (Cork) Ireland
  • Tidal variance: Slight tidal variance is unlikely to restrict full time wheelchair users in disembarkation.
  • Accessibility around port: Flat and even
  • Distance to main town: Within half a mile (150 metres)
  • Accessibility of main town paving: The town itself is hilly and most of the parents have dropped kerbs.
  • Accessible toilets: Located at most hotels.
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: None.
  • Public transport: Not accessible. Euro taxis (able to carry 1 wheelchair user- available on request- very limited.
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 17 km
  • Accessible places of interest: Old Midleton distillery, certain parts of blarney estate (not the castle) and Titanic Museum.

Dublin

Dublin Ireland

Dublin, capital of the Republic of Ireland, is on Ireland’s east coast at the mouth of the River Liffey. Its historic buildings include Dublin Castle, dating to the 13th century, and imposing St Patrick’s Cathedral, founded in 1191. City parks include landscaped St Stephen’s Green and huge Phoenix Park, containing Dublin Zoo. The National Museum of Ireland explores Irish heritage and culture.

Dublin Ireland
  • Tidal variance: Moderate tidal variance may restrict full time wheelchair users in disembarkation, please see on board staff for accessible gangway times.
  • Accessibility around port: Dublin Port is a working port and is busy at all times, and for health & safety reason passengers are not allowed to walk around the port
  • Distance to main town: Approximately 5 km
  • Accessibility of main town paving: The town itself is flat with hilly areas and most of the parents have dropped kerbs.
  • Accessible toilets: Located at most big hotels and some public locations.
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: Temple bar area.
  • Public transport: Some buses are accessible. Euro taxis (able to carry 1 wheelchair user- available on request- very limited)
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 5 km
  • Accessible places of interest: Guinness Storehouse, Old Whiskey Distillery, St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

Iceland

Iceland, a Nordic island nation, is defined by its dramatic landscape with volcanoes, geysers, hot springs and lava fields. Massive glaciers are protected in Vatnajökull and Snæfellsjökull national parks. Most of the population lives in the capital, Reykjavik, which runs on geothermal power and is home to the National and Saga museums, tracing Iceland’s Viking history.

Island of Iceland

Reykjavik

Reykjavik

Reykjavik, on the coast of Iceland, is the country’s capital and largest city. It’s home to the National and Saga museums, tracing Iceland’s Viking history. The striking concrete Hallgrimskirkja church and rotating Perlan glass dome offer sweeping views of the sea and nearby hills. Exemplifying the island’s volcanic activity is the geothermal Blue Lagoon spa, near the village of Grindavik.

Reykjavik
  • Tidal variance: Moderate tidal variance may restrict full-time wheelchair users in disembarkation. Please see the onboard staff to confirm the accessible gangway times. (Possible Tender)
  • Accessibility around port: Flat and even
  • Distance to main town: 5 km
  • Accessibility of main town paving: Mostly a hilly town; however, most pavements have dropped kerbs
  • Accessible toilets: Located in many official buildings, cafes, restaurants, museums, hotels and information centres.
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: Arbaer folk museum.
  • Public transport: All buses in Reykjavik are accessible by a ramp at the back of the bus, however individuals are required to get on and off the bus alone. Euro taxis (able to carry 1 wheelchair user- available on request- very limited)
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 3 km
  • Accessible places of interest: The Pearl

STORY OF INTEREST

An important project that happened in recent years is Ramp up Reykjavik. The project began in March 2021 by Haraldur Thorleifsson, a local citizen and wheelchair user, who was frustrated with the lack of accessible venues in Reykjavik. He decided to make a change and thus launched Ramp up Reykjavik with the goal of installing 100 ramps around the city within one year. Teaming up with the City of Reykjavik, local businesses, labor unions, and government offices, the program solicited donations to fund the 100 ramps, Thorleifsson himself also donated €319,000, which the City of Reykjavik later matched. Ramp up Reykjavik covered up to 80% of the cost for local businesses setting up ramps, and the initiative was so successful that it met its goal of 100 ramps four months ahead of schedule. The project now has a surplus remaining which will be used to install additional ramps around Iceland, with a new goal of installing 1,000 ramps across the country.

Akureyri

Akureyri

Akureyri is a city at the base of Eyjafjörður Fjord in northern Iceland. In the center, the 1940 Akureyri Church has stained-glass windows portraying scenes from Icelandic Christian history. There are views of the fjord from the forecourt. Nearby, the Akureyri Art Museum displays contemporary art from Iceland and farther afield. To the south are the Botanical Gardens, with specimens from across Iceland.

Akureyri
  • Tidal variance: Moderate tidal variance may restrict full-time wheelchair users in disembarkation. Please see the onboard staff to confirm the accessible gangway times. (Possible Tender)
  • Accessibility around port: Flat and even
  • Distance to main town: Approximately 300 meters
  • Accessibility of main town paving: Mostly a flat town; most pavements have dropped kerbs
  • Accessible toilets: Located in many official buildings, cafes, restaurants, museums, hotels and information centres.
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: None
  • Public transport: None.
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 500 meters
  • Accessible places of interest: Most museums, shops and public buildings are accessible.

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