Accessible Port Guide For A Norwegian Fjords Cruise

Me

Norway is a Scandinavian country encompassing mountains, glaciers and deep coastal fjords. Oslo, the capital, is a city of green spaces and museums. Preserved 9th-century Viking ships are displayed at Oslo’s Viking Ship Museum. Bergen, with colorful wooden houses, is the starting point for cruises to the dramatic Sognefjord. Norway is also known for fishing, hiking and skiing, notably at Lillehammer’s Olympic resort.

Norway

Alesund

Ålesund is a port town on the west coast of Norway, at the entrance to the Geirangerfjord. It’s known for the art nouveau architectural style in which most of the town was rebuilt after a fire in 1904, as documented at the Jugendstilsenteret museum. There are panoramic views of Ålesund’s architecture, the surrounding archipelago and fjords from the Mount Aksla lookout.

Alesund
  • Tidal variance: Slight tidal variance is unlikely to restrict full-time wheelchair users in disembarkation
  • Accessibility around port: Flat and even
  • Distance to main town: Approximately 100 metres
  • Accessibility of main town paving: The town itself is mostly flat with a few hilly areas and most of the pavements have dropped kerbs
  • Accessible toilets: Located at the town hall, shopping centre and hotels
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: A lot of the streets have cobblestones, particularly the pedestrian streets.
  • Public transport: Some accessible
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 100 metres
  • Accessible locations: Art Nouveau Museum, Ålesund is often cited as the most beautiful town in Norway – an impressive feat in a country filled with so many picture-postcard destinations. After being destroyed by fire 1904, the town was almost entirely rebuilt in an Art Nouveau style, with pastel-coloured buildings, elaborate facades and quaint spires, giving it a fairytale quality that endures to this day. Ålesund’s cruise dock is just a two-minute walk from town, making access to the main sights highly convenient. There’s also a wheelchair-accessible hop-on hop-off bus tour that picks guests up from the port and calls at eight stops, including the Aquarium, the open-air Sunnmøre Museum and the breathtaking Aksla Viewpoint in the hills above town.

Bergen

Bergen is a city on Norway’s southwestern coast. It’s surrounded by mountains and fjords, including Sognefjord, the country’s longest and deepest. Bryggen features colorful wooden houses on the old wharf, once a center of the Hanseatic League’s trading empire. The Fløibanen Funicular goes up Fløyen Mountain for panoramic views and hiking trails. The Edvard Grieg House is where the renowned composer once lived.

Bergen
  • Tidal variance: Slight tidal variance is unlikely to restrict full-time wheelchair users in disembarkation
  • Accessibility around port: Flat, even and wheelchair accessible. If the ship is berthed at Dokken pier, passengers are not able to move freely on the pier as this is an industrial pier. Passengers must make use of the shuttle provided by the port. In addition to regular shuttle buses, the port provides one minivan that can hold two wheelchairs and will operate throughout the day
  • Distance to main town: Approximately 1km
  • Accessibility of main town paving: The town itself is flat and easily accessible and most of the pavements have dropped kerbs
  • Accessible toilets: Most of the hotels allow guests to use the toilets. There are adapted toilets on top of Mt Fløien
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: The pedestrian street Gågaten, Nygårdshøyden (the university area) and Nordnes are not accessible
  • Public transport: Busses are generally not accessible
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 1km
  • Accessible locations: The Aquarium, Bergen Art Museum, funicular railway, The ancient Nordic city of Bergen is mainstay of cruise holidays, with so much to entice and entertain visitors. Its colourful Bryggen waterfront is packed with picturesque timber shop fronts and lively market stalls, while key attractions like the Maritime Museum, Natural History Collection and Bergen Art Museum are all accessible to disabled guests. Don’t leave without taking a ride on the Mount Fløyen funicular railway, where you can enjoy splendid views of the city from 1,000 feet above sea level. The funicular’s two stations are wheelchair accessible, with the upper station featuring a selection of trails for wheelchair users.

Flam

Flåm is a village in southwestern Norway, in an area known for its fjords. It sits at the end of Aurlandsfjord, a branch of the vast Sognefjord. The dramatic Stegastein viewing platform juts out high above the Aurlandsfjord. South of Flåm Harbor, the 17th-century wooden Flåm Church lies in the valley. The Flåm Railway offers valley and waterfall views as it climbs to a station on the Hardangervidda plateau.

Flam
  • Tidal variance: Possible tender. Slight if ship is alongside. Slight tidal variance is unlikely to restrict full-time wheelchair users in disembarkation
  • Accessibility around port: Mainly flat and even
  • Distance to main town: Approximately 200 metres
  • Accessibility of main town paving: The village itself is flat and easily accessible
  • Accessible toilets: Located at station building, restaurants and hotels
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: None.
  • Public transport: Flåmsbana
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 200 metres
  • Accessible locations: Flåm Railway Documentation Centre,

Geiranger

Geiranger is a village in western Norway, at the head of Geirangerfjord. The Norwegian Fjord Center has multimedia on the history of the region and its inhabitants. Part of the steep Trollstigen mountain road weaves through the village, connecting to Flydalsjuvet lookout, which has views over the fjord. The fjord’s waterfalls, including the Seven Sisters, the Suitor and the Bridal Veil, are visible by boat.

Geiranger
  • Tidal variance: Possible tender, if alongside slight. Slight tidal variance is unlikely to restrict full-time wheelchair users in disembarkation
  • Accessibility around port: Flat and even
  • Distance to main town: Tender berth is in town
  • Accessibility of main town paving: The town itself is flat and easily accessible; however, most of the pavements do not have dropped kerbs
  • Accessible toilets: Located at Tourist Information (at the pier) and Hotel Geiranger
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: None.
  • Public transport: Some accessible
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 30 metres
  • Accessible locations: Geiranger Fjord centre. Geiranger is a small village of 220 inhabitants, Everything is very close and easy to reach, Famed as the “Pearl of the Norwegian Fjords”, the deep-blue Geirangerfjord amazes cruisers with its mystical mountain peaks, spectacular waterfalls and lush green vegetation. The waterfalls are the stars of the show, notably the Seven Sisters, whose septet of sparkling streams entrance visitors with sheer veils of mist and rainbows as they cascade over 800 feet down the mountainside. The fjord culminates at the small village of Geiranger, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site on account of its amazing scenery. From the village you can take a trip up a twisting mountain road to the Geiranger Skywalk, a wheelchair-accessible vantage point boasting one of the country’s best views of the fjords.

Olden

Olden is a village and urban area in the municipality of Stryn in Vestland county, Norway. Olden is located at the mouth of the Oldeelva river at the northern end of the Oldedalen valley on the southern shore of the Nordfjorden.

Olden
  • Tidal variance: Slight tidal variance is unlikely to restrict full-time wheelchair users in disembarkation
  • Accessibility around port: Flat and even
  • Distance to main town: Approximately 700 metres
  • Accessibility of main town paving: The village itself is flat with hilly areas (can be avoided) and most of the pavements have dropped kerbs
  • Accessible toilets: Located at the pier information centre
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: None.
  • Public transport: Not accessible
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 700 metres
  • Accessible locations: Town Centre,

Stavanger

Stavanger is a city in southwestern Norway. In the center of town, Stavanger Cathedral dates back to the city’s 12th-century founding. Stavanger Museum chronicles the city’s history and displays preserved wildlife. The Norwegian Petroleum Museum illuminates the oil industry with submersibles, a large drill bit and an escape chute. The shopping street Øvre Holmegate is known for its colorful houses.

Stavanger
  • Tidal variance: Slight tidal variance is unlikely to restrict full-time wheelchair users in disembarkation
  • Accessibility around port: Flat and even
  • Distance to main town: Approximately 400 metres
  • Accessibility of main town paving: The town itself is flat and easily accessible and some of the pavements have dropped kerbs
  • Accessible toilets: Located at Sølvberget Kulturhus, in the shopping centres
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: The area of Gamle (Old Stavanger) should be avoided as it is hilly and has cobblestones. Also part of the city centre; i.e., on the other side of the bay, is partly hilly and cobblestoned. Most suitable is the area from the pier and to the market and then around Breivannet lake. Following the pier area around the bay and then into Oestervaag by the Petroleum Museum should avoid too much incline. At Østervåg shopping street there are cobblestones but amended for wheelchair users
  • Public transport: Some public transport is accessible
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 600 metres
  • Accessible locations: Norwegian Petroleum Museum, Archaeological Museum, The first port of call for many Fjords cruises, the attractive city of Stavanger with its white wooden houses and characterful Old Town serves as a charming introduction to Norway. As well as being home to several important museums, such as the wheelchair-friendly Norwegian Petroleum Museum, Stavanger is highly regarded as Norway’s gastronomic capital, with a wide range of impressive restaurants, cafés and coffee shops. Cruises to Stavanger often continue along the nearby Lysefjord, where visitors can marvel at dramatic landmarks like the looming Pulpit Rock and Kjerag mountain, famous for its iconic large boulder suspended in mid-air between two sheer cliff faces.

Tromsø

Tromsø is a city in Tromsø Municipality in Troms og Finnmark county, Norway. The city is the administrative centre of the municipality as well as the administrative centre of Troms county. The Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland and its Bishop are based at the Tromsø Cathedral in the city.

Tromsø
  • Tidal variance: Slight tidal variance is unlikely to restrict full-time wheelchair users in disembarkation
  • Accessibility around port: Flat and even
  • Distance to main town: Approximately 3 km
  • Accessibility of main town paving: The town itself is quite hilly apart from the Grønngate and Gågate streets, which are fairly accessible. Most of the pavements do not have dropped kerbs
  • Accessible toilets: Located at Venteromskafeen (next to Tourist Information), Steen & Strøm Shopping Centre, Amfi Veita Shopping Centre and most cafés
  • Cobblestone streets or unsuitable terrain: Grønngate and Gågate streets are the most accessible areas
  • Public transport: Not Accessible
  • Shopping areas: Approximately 4km
  • Accessible locations: Polaria, Tromsø Museum and Northern Norwegian Art Museum, Known as the Gateway to the Arctic, the lively northern city of Tromsø occupies a wonderful setting on an island between sea and snowy mountains, 186 miles inside the polar circle. Its northerly location makes it ideal for admiring the Northern Lights during the winter, especially between November and January, when the sun never rises above the horizon. For a truly magical experience, you can take a husky sled dog ride (suitable for people with limited mobility) under the moonlight and green shimmer of the Northern Lights. Tromsø is also home to accessible attractions such as the striking Arctic Cathedral, an aquarium, several quality museums, and the world’s northernmost botanical garden.

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Louise Lee says:

    Hi, This information is brilliant. Thank you. Continue to enjoy cruising.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you I appreciate that and I hope this helps, enjoy your cruises!

      Like

  2. Paula says:

    Wow this is fabulous thank you so much.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much I appreciate it x

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.